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Barcelona: the Miro Museum and Chinese Art

Just coming out of a sweltering and disappointing visit to the overcrowded Parc Guell, we hopped in a cab and headed to the Miro Museum. This was one of the major stops that had been missed on the last trip. Joan Miro has always been a favourite of mine partially for his purity of line and composition and partly for the simple fact that he doesn’t shy away from the primary colours.

miro tapestry

The tapestry above was the single most impressive piece in the museum. You end up wondering how the thing is kept clean but overall you try to imagine if there is anyway you can afford a house with a wall that could hold a good reproduction of this. No pictures were allowed in the museum so I had to take the photographs of interior works of art for this entry off the web. However, the sculptures outside were fair game.

miro sculpture

The one just above is at the entrance to the museum and the one below on the roof.

miro sculpture 2

Also at this time was a travelling exhibition of new Chinese art and as much as I liked Miro, this was my favourite part of the museum. (Not to downplay Miro at all; this was one of the best single artist museums other than Dali’s that I have enjoyed as much (Dali coming soon)). As I wrote in the last post on Chinese art, I was astonished by the breadth and dynamism of the work. One of the best, and most well known, was the work of Yue Minjin.

yue minjun 4

These figures which stand about six feet high, each the same as the other and each perfectly spaced, make quite an impression in person.    They are a crowd sculpture really and certainly draw inspiration from the recently discovered terracotta army in China, and thereby evoking both the distant past, as well as the more recent past of collectivism.

The faces are versions of his own and permeate his art.

On steps opposite to this was a single figure reading a newspaper which you almost mistook for a man just sitting down for a moment.  This deception reminded me of Duane Hanson‘s sculptures which were often mistaken for actual people amongst the art (he would do security guards, people with shopping cars, etc, see below).  It always amused me to think that collectors would have these common folk infiltrating their pristeen and perfect houses.

duane hanson tourists

Yue’s work often is based on well known Western art such as the take on Goya here.

yue minjun 2

Or here, Delacroix.

freedomdelacroix liberty

2 comments on “Barcelona: the Miro Museum and Chinese Art

  1. […] Aaress Lawless Escribio un articulo buenisimo hoyAqui hay un pedazo del articuloJust coming out of a sweltering and disappointing visit to the overcrowded Parc Guell, we hopped in a cab and headed to the Miro Museum. This was one of the major stops that had been missed on the last trip. Joan Miro has always been a … Lea el resto de este fabuloso articulo here Posted in Uncategorized Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. […]

  2. That tapestry is just… woah.

    Yeah, the sculpture looks like E.T. Surely they meant it to.

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